• Ep 66 BC Kid’s Camp

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:
    This week I speak with Selena Devries, a Registered Dietitian who is taking on the task of starting a Celiac Kid’s Camp in Kelowna BC. Selena has the sponsorship of the Kelowna Chapter of the CCA, as well as local businesses. We chat about her plans for the camp, as well as my experience organizing a kid’s camp in Ontario. If you would like more information about the Kelowna BC camp go online to www.healthbean.ca. I also mention the Rod McDaniel’s Celiac Kids Camp operated by the Calgary Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association. You can find out more about the Calgary camp at www.calgaryceliac.ca.

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    It’s been quite a few years since I organized a celiac kid’s camp in Ontario.  When I spoke with Selena about her plans for a camp, it allowed me to reflect on the many things I found were often common among kids with celiac disease.

    Most importantly, they don’t want to be different.  They don’t want to stand out, especially at meal times, when friends and classmates gather for socializing.  They often feel alone.  They often have less self-confidence in physical activities.  They have been sidelined, in more ways than one. These are just my observations. 

    As a parent of a celiac child, I know I tried extra hard to make her life “normal”, if somewhat wrapped in bubble-wrap.  The best way I found to make my daughter feel normal was for her to interact with other kids with celiac disease. 

    We attended a CCA conference together when she was 8 or 9 and she met another girl who was celiac, and also had a celiac Mom.  They shared many interests and hit it off instantly.  I invited the mother and daughter to visit us, which they did, and we had a great time, eating gluten free and letting the girls become fast friends.

    It’s hard to estimate how much the girls gained from their friendship, but it did last for many years.  Now that they are both adults and getting on with their lives, I can see the positive impact having peers with celiac disease made on my daughter.  I tried hard to make my daughter’s life “normal”, but in reflection, maybe the best part of being normal was having a supportive friend – or friends as she later made at camp.  Today, my daughter is a well-adjusted adult who takes her celiac disease in stride, just like her celiac friends.

  • Ep 65 Gluten Free Garage 2019 Edition

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    The Gluten Free Garage is Toronto’s premiere Gluten Free Vendor Food Show.  This year the Gluten Free Garage is happening the day after the CCA is holding an important conference, meetings and fund raiser in Toronto.  On this episode I speak with RonniLyn Pustil the energy behind the event being held on May 26th.  I was at the GF Garage last year with my podcast and am excited to attend again this year.  As the CCA is a sponsor, RonniLyn was able to secure Shelley Case to speak at the event.  Lots of interesting speakers and delicious products will be there.  Jess of GFWifey will be there collecting GF food for the foodbank, a project she is passionate about.  You can find the Gluten Free Garage online at www.glutenfreegarage.ca or on Instagram @glutenfreegarage.

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    I love some gluten free food shows.  I say some, because I know how hard it is to attract a good combination of food producers to a show.  The food producers must be reliable – they must show up with plenty of food.  They must prove that their products are made to suitable gluten free standards and they should be setting realistic prices.

    Many of the most innovative gluten free producers can be found throughout Canada at farmer’s markets.  It’s there where you get a chance to talk directly to the person who conceived the recipe, or managed the production of the food.  You can ask the questions that make a difference to you.  The problem with most of these food producers is that they can’t keep up with demand when it comes at a specialty food show, or for retail outlets.  Often, the only place to get their goodies is at their market stalls.

    The best GF food shows are curated to include these small producers.  Curation takes, time, energy and passion.  The curator (in the case of GF Garage is RonniLyn), must ask all the questions you’d ask at the farmer’s market and then some.  They must be assured that these gluten free foods are safe for the patrons attending the show.  This is a huge responsibility and one that large food shows organized primarily for profit often don’t do well.

    I support what RonniLyn is doing, as I support what Kathy Smart is doing in Ottawa for her food show.  These are two passionate women who make our experiences at their food shows memorable.  Thanks, RonniLyn and Kathy – we’ll do our best to eat our way through your food shows to make your efforts worthwhile!

  • Ep 64 Eating Gluten Free in Airports

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    Have you ever been excited or anxious to fly, but then realized you still had to worry about what you’d be able to eat while waiting to board, or worse still what would happen if the flight was delayed and you’re stuck beyond the security line with nothing to eat?  My guest this week, Lisa, has taken it upon herself to write to Customer Service at the Vancouver Airport to request more gluten free options.  We chat about her motivation, how the airport responded to her and a great example of how one airport is stepping up for gluten free food.  Lisa originally posted her letter to the airport on her facebook page and has since re-posted it.  You can find her on facebook @GFKetogirl.

    Here’s the link to the Pearson Airport in Toronto webpage I spoke about – https://torontopearson.com/foodanddrink/#utm_source=social&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=retail2018

    Here is the email for customer service at Vancouver Airport YVR – customercallcentre@yvr.ca

    YVR also provided contact information for the airlines using YVR – http://www.yvr.ca/en/passengers/flights/airlines-and-destinations

    Here is the email to contact the Canadian Air Security Authority (CATSA) regarding questions about taking food items through security – correspondence@catsa.gc.ca

    Here is a link to the list of solid food items CATSA permits through screening – https://www.catsa-acsta.gc.ca/en/travelling-solid-food-items

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    I used to fly more than I do now.  For many years we lived outside of Canada and flew home a couple of times a year.  I worked as a travel agent during that time, which also allowed me to take advantage of some special offers, so I travelled for pleasure more than most people. 

    I remember one of the first times I ordered a gluten free meal – I was pleased when my meal was placed in front of me at the very beginning of the meal service.  I was set, but thought, out of courtesy that I should wait for my husband to get his meal before I started to eat mine.  That was lucky, as when his came, and I compared it to mine, I realized they didn’t get mine right.  It was a pasta dish with chicken and although mine looked somewhat different, the pasta was the same.  The airline had no explanation and no back up.

    I learned to always take food with me on board, as I’m sure most people on a special diet do.  Life gets more complicated when you have a stop-over, have to change planes and sometimes have a long wait.  I found, just as Lisa did, that some airports have more options than others.  Most of my layovers were in Atlanta.  I learned quickly that many of the hotdogs where fine to eat if they handled the wiener properly and never put it in a bun.  It wasn’t long before I had a plan for my layover in Atlanta which included a couple of quick stops at select kiosks. 

    When my daughter was diagnosed at age 5, the plan worked for her too.  I would leave my husband with our younger daughter and Deanna and I would go off to get our safe food.  They could eat anywhere. 

    Having a plan is still the best approach.  Nowadays, you can look up more information online before flying to make the best of a new airport.  You should always have a food plan before you leave home – I usually do.  I suppose this lesson is more for those newly diagnosed.  Take some time to figure out the food before you leave home, and don’t expect solutions – make your own.

    PS – Always travel with safe snacks!

  • Ep 63 Ellen’s Healthy Favourites

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    This episode is a follow-up interview with Ellen Bayens of The Celiac Scene on our favourite foods.  Episode 45 looked at many of our favourite foods, but in retrospect, most of the foods mentioned weren’t particularly healthy.  We thought it would be best to level out the options with a chat on our favourite healthy gluten free foods.  Ellen sent me the links to the recipes she chatted about, all are gluten free and some also fit into a low carb high protein diet –

    Here’s the recipe for the low-calorie gluten free english muffins I spoke about –

    ¼ cup oat flour (make sure it’s labelled as gluten free)

    ½ tsp baking powder

    Pinch of salt

    Blend together and add –

    1 egg

    2 Tbsp unsweetened applesauce OR plain Greek yogurt

    Stir till well blended.  Spray or grease a cereal bowl or ramekin and spoon half of the mixture in, cover with plastic wrap and microwave on high for 1 ½ – 2 minutes.  Makes 2 muffins.

    This photo is from Francine who co-hosted with me on the Gluten Free Weigh In podcast.

    Ellen can be found online at theceliacscene.com, and also on facebook and Instagram.

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    Changing to a gluten free diet was hard.  I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again.  Getting the diagnosis that a gluten free diet is the only treatment for a condition you have suffered with for many years is life-changing and the best thing that ever happened to me – but it was still hard.  It became harder when my daughter was diagnosed and I tried to feed her everything I remembered from my childhood.

    It’s only been over the past 5 years or so that my diet has made the huge shift in the direction of being healthier.  This isn’t to say that I don’t sometimes snack on gluten free pretzels, or chips or even chocolate, but I am much more aware of the fat and calories these foods contain.

    As we all realize, knowing what’s in our food doesn’t necessarily lead to making the best food choices.  Healthy isn’t like gluten – it’s there or it’s not – healthy is subjective and appears in many different degrees. 

    Deciding to have weight loss surgery was a big decision, but one I am glad I made.  I had always struggled with my weight, and when I had to eat gluten free, I found enough unhealthy foods to keep me overweight. It wasn’t difficult.  With the popularity of gluten free growing and manufacturers jumping on the bandwagon, the trend was to make something gluten free that was closest to its wheat counterpart.  In most cases the result was a food high in fat and sugar to compensate for the difference in taste and texture.

    Since my surgery, my diet has evolved.  I now enjoy choosing healthier foods on a regular basis.  I love salads and don’t crave breads – I still enjoy them occasionally, but don’t crave them.  I eat smaller meals, but more often. The big switch to gluten free was a dramatic change, but working with the gluten free diet to make it healthier for me was gradual and will continue.  The baker in me will always be looking for the next recipe to make something healthy, satisfying and nourishing.  Make it gluten free and make it healthy-ish and I’m there.

  • Ep 62 Italian and Gluten Free

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:
    On this episode I interview a blogger from Toronto, Ashley Gismondi, who is a proud Italian-Canadian. Ashley shares how her gluten free diet fits with the foods she was brought up on. She chats about cooking with her Nonna as a young child and lets us know about some Italian favourites that can be easily made gluten free. Ashley can be found online at www.celiacandthe6ix.com

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    It’s funny what you remember from your childhood.  My heritage is British, but along the way, my family took a liking to many kinds of foods.  My father travelled on business for extended periods of time, and one of his favourite places to go was Italy.  I remember as a child he would come home and amaze us with the few words he had learned in Italian.

    My mother was a good cook, not a very adventurous one, but the food produced in her kitchen was nourishing, flavourful and satisfying, or in a word, memorable.  My mother was always keen to cut recipes out of the newspaper, something that I don’t know even appears in newspapers today.  I would often find yellowed, dog-eared scraps of printed paper with a favourite recipe on the counter or tucked into her recipe drawer – yes, it took a whole drawer to contain her carefully curated recipe collection.

    Most Saturdays, my mother made spaghetti sauce.  I never thought much of it until, as an adult, I realized that this was common in Italian homes, but not-so-common in other homes.  Since my father had travelled to Italy so many times, he appointed himself the pasta cooking expert.  I’m not sure if this venerated position existed in other households, but it certainly did in ours.  There was a special pasta pot, he always used a kitchen timer and took over the kitchen for those brief minutes until the pasta was perfectly “a la dente”.

    Making spaghetti on a Saturday was something my parents collaborated on for as long as I can remember.  I can assure you, I didn’t leave home without the recipe.  Now, when I make the meat sauce (it has to be a double recipe to save some for the freezer), my home smells like it did when I was a kid.  It came up in the podcast, and just thinking about it, I can savour the rich aroma of Mom’s meat sauce on the stove.  Some things remind you of home, the smell of my Mom’s sauce recipe reminds me of so much more and yes, the original recipe was always gluten free.

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  • Ep 61 Taxes & Celiac Disease in Canada

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    This episode looks at how, in Canada, a celiac can make a claim on their taxes for the extra expense of gluten free food.  The subject sounds simple enough, but as we find out, the Canada Revenue Agency has made the process laborious with very little positive effect on your tax return.  For a professional perspective, I speak with my daughter, Deanna, who is an accountant and has worked with taxes for years.

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    I said most of what I think about this issue in the podcast, but there is one thing I want to touch on here briefly.

    Is Celiac Disease a disability?  There are different definitions of a disability, and certainly celiac disease, or aspects of how it effects our lives, meet some of these criteria.  Personally, I don’t want to look at CD as a disability.  Yes, it affects everything I eat and all the work and decisions that go into that, but in my other day-to-day activities, I, personally don’t feel its impact.

    There are many, who have other autoimmune conditions as a result of their CD, and those conditions can range from simple to complex, painful and debilitating.  That has not happened to me, and I’m hoping that by managing my CD closely, other conditions will be minimized, or held off completely.

    Except for CD, I consider myself healthy.  I am fortunate, I don’t take any medication, except for some recommended supplements, and I feel I can function well in a fast-paced lifestyle.  Many things are difficult – all around the aspect of food, but I can learn to deal with those. Other people may find an advantage is identifying as disabled, and I would not take anything away from them for that.  For me, CD is not a disease, or a disability – it is condition that I am managing well.  I’ve had lots of experience with it, and am comfortable both with CD and the gluten free diet.

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  • Ep 60 Filling a Gluten Free Need

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:
    This episode is a look at a different kind of gluten free entrepreneur, one that has set herself up to fill the needs of her local community. Sue Torrance operates Tasty Indulgences from a commercial kitchen in her basement. She doesn’t have a store front, but makes her desserts and comfort food meals available at local stores and a restaurant. Sue is located in Prescott, Ontario. You can find her on facebook @tastyindulgences.


    Sue’s Websites and Social Media
    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com
    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com
    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast
    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA
    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com
    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com
    Instagram – @suesgfbaking
    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL
    (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)
    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com
    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts –
    Most people think entrepreneurs start a business to make money. I think if you ask them, they start businesses to fill a need. In the case of Sue Torrance, she saw a need in her local community. I can relate well to this, as I saw the same need, but mine was years earlier.


    When we think of gluten free food producers, we often think of the big names that have widespread distribution and are relatively easy to find in stores and online. I find that many of the smaller businesses are much more interesting. They often fill a more specific need, and do so for a variety of reasons. Some start out on a shoestring budget and many are one-person operations for a long time, as they get established.


    I remember taking a course put on by a local business development group where I live, in which the participants were flushing out ideas for new local businesses. Getting together with other entrepreneurs and facilitators was a valuable experience. One thing I learned is that just because you get compliments on something, your baking for instance, doesn’t mean people other than your immediate family will actually shell out money for it.


    With me, it took a while to fully form my business plan and strategy. I decided to start very small, with very few resources and call in favours from whomever I could. It was hard work, as any entrepreneur will tell you. What keeps you going is that fact that you are making a difference, in your local community, or in a larger market. Maybe you are disrupting established businesses, maybe you are introducing something new. Either way, you are making a mark, making a difference.


    I often did taste testing of my baked goods in different locations and situations. Many people who require gluten free and had been deprived of certain foods for years, were brought to tears tasting my baked goods. For me that made it worthwhile. The work of an entrepreneur is rewarded in many different ways. I started on a shoestring, but got back a fortune in appreciation.

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  • Ep 59 East Indian and Gluten Free

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    This episode is the first in a series of talks with individuals from different cultures eating gluten free.  My first interview is with Diyaa who has grown up in an East Indian family eating food you may or may not be familiar with.  Diyaa talks about how gluten and wheat fit into her family’s diet including family gatherings and events.  We chat about which East Indian foods are naturally gluten free.  You may be surprised with some new food finds.  You can follow Diyaa on Instagram @lifeafterroti.  If you have a story about how you cope eating gluten free and adapting your cultural food and traditions into a gluten free lifestyle, please email me at acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com.

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    During the podcast I spoke about how much I enjoyed Indian food, even before I knew I was celiac.  When I had my two daughters, we continued, as a family to enjoy curry, rice, butter chicken and pappadums (also spelled poppadums and puppodums).  For years my family has enjoyed Patak’s pappadums which are bought dry and easily brought to life in oil at home.  You should give them a try.

    I have made my own curry, used different curry pastes and sauces and enjoyed takeout for many years.  I remember, there was an amazing Indian restaurant we loved when we lived in Bermuda and we got butter chicken takeout on a regular basis.  The girls called it pink chicken. 

    I wasn’t raised on curry of any form and it wasn’t until I was an adult that I was introduced to this flavourful cuisine.  Once, when one of our daughters had a friend over and we ordered our favourite curry takeout, my daughter was very confused when her friend had never tasted curry before.  Now, both girls make and enjoy curry in their own kitchens.

    The lesson here is to try new foods, have an open mind to different naturally gluten free foods and flavourings and don’t be afraid to share these finds with your families.  If you’ve never done it before, try bringing a chicken curry and pappadums to your next family gathering and see what happens.  Maybe you too will start a new family tradition.

    On a side note – last year, when Deanna visited Bermuda as an adult, one of the meals she wanted to have was “pink chicken” – she got it, and enjoyed it, it brought back childhood memories and did not disappoint.  Food memories can be powerful and this is one our family shares.

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  • Ep 58 Senior’s Residence Guide

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    This week I speak with Edith Lalanne to find out more about the publication of the Practical Guide to Gluten-Related Disorders and the Gluten-Free Diet for Public and Private Senior’s Residences and Meals-on-Wheels Services.  Edith explains how the booklet came about and how best to use it as a resource guide.   It can be purchased from the Canadian Celiac Association on their website at www.celiac.ca and from the Fondation Quebecoise de la Maladie Coeliaque on their website at www.fqmc.org

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    Organizing the move of a senior relative into a retirement residence is something you don’t think much about until you have to do it.  In four months last year, I assisted with three of these difficult moves.  As a family we have been fortunate that our loved ones were in a position to make the choice to move willingly, which made our job much easier and less stressful.

    During our visits to different homes, we were often offered a meal.  This is one way to let prospective residents know what to expect if they moved in.  It did throw a bit of a wrench into the works when I had to eat gluten free.  I wasn’t the prospective resident, but I was the one requiring the special meal.

    On every occasion, I was pleasantly surprised with what was presented to me.  One of the wait staff even admitted he was celiac and assured me that the kitchen took gluten free very seriously.  I enjoyed my meals on those days, and continue to enjoy the food when I visit and eat with my relatives. 

    My experience was very positive, but I do know that this is not always what happens.  In years past, I have heard of instances when the elderly were told their gluten free diet would not be catered for and the best way to eat gluten free was to supply their own food.  Since this was not my relative, it was difficult to get involved, and became a cause of great stressful for the family.  The practical guide could not have come too soon.

    Trying to be positive, I hope the bad experiences are behind us, and the more enlightened chefs and executive chefs (the ones really making the decisions) are understanding the gluten free diet and striving to get it right.  At my last meal with my parents, the server told me there were 3 (out of 100) residents on a gluten free diet, and served me a tasty nutritious meal.

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  • Ep 57 Selena De Vries Explains the New Food Guide

    Let’s start the blog with the Show Notes for this episode:

    This episode is a look at the new Canada’s Food Guide with Registered Dietitian Selena De Vries.  The new food guide is a dramatic change from the recommendations we have known for years.  We have always been told to eat so many servings from different food groups.  The new guide takes a different approach and Selena does a great job breaking that down for us.

    Selena was a past guest on Episode 14 of the podcast discussing the challenges of losing weight and maintaining a healthy weight on a strict gluten free diet. 

    Selena has written about the new food guide on her website at –

    The Canadian Food Guide and Celiac Disease

    The new Canadian Food Guide was released and it is quite a drastic change from the old 2007 edition. Overall, it’s a very welcomed step in the right direction. The first thing to emphasize is that this a population health guide.

    Selena can be found online at – www.healthbean.ca

    on Facebook at Healthbean Nutrition and on Instagram at celiac_dietitian

    Sue’s Websites and Social Media

    Podcast https://acanadianceliacpodcast.libsyn.com

    Podcast Blog – https://www.acanadianceliacblog.com

    Facebook – @acanadianceliacpodcast

    Twitter – CeliacPodcastCA

    Email – acdnceliacpodcast@gmail.com

    Baking Website – https://www.suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Instagram – @suesgfbaking

    YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUVGfpD4eJwwSc_YjkGagza06yYe3ApzL

         (search Sues Gluten Free Baking)

    Email – sue@suesglutenfreebaking.com

    Other Podcast – Gluten Free Weigh In – https://glutenfreeweighin.libsyn.com

    My Thoughts

    A year ago, I thought I knew almost everything there was to know about living a healthy gluten free lifestyle with celiac disease.  I was wrong.  I’ve learned so much this past year producing the podcast and talking with different experts and celiacs from across the country. 

    After speaking with Selena DeVries on Episode 14 of the podcast, I was inspired to develop another podcast that looked at how individuals are coping with losing weight and maintaining it on a gluten free diet.  I have always been overweight, and it took weight-loss surgery to get me on track.  I started the second podcast in the summer of 2018.

    When I look at what I’ve learned about the gluten free diet, from both A Canadian Celiac Podcast and the Gluten Free Weigh In podcast, I can safely say that using the structure of a gluten free diet to eat healthy, eat more single ingredient foods, eat mindfully and enjoy food have been the common themes I’ve spoken about in both podcasts. 

    Fast forward to January 2019 and the release of Canada’s New Food Guide.  It took me a while to connect the dots.  The mindful eating of mostly unprocessed foods; efforts to make more food at home; and enjoy it more were there in the new recommendations.  I’m doing something right on my gluten free journey, and I have to credit much of my enlightenment to the various people I’ve spoken with for research and interviews over the past year.  I love when a plan comes together.

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